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What We Can Learn From Chrystèle Saint-Louis Augustin

I imagine that the pressures of modelling must be overwhelming at times. It must be much easier to go with the flow and blend in with all of the other models. That is why I admire Chrystèle Saint-Louis Augustin, a French model of Caribbean descent (both of her parents are from Martinique according to information I found about her). Why do I admire Ms. Augustin? Well, among other things as the pictures illustrate, she sports a head full of coily hair. In my opinion, she ROCKS HER FRO! It could be said that Ms. Augustin’s mane is remniscent of an earlier super model, Ms. Peggy Dillard.



I imagine that the pressures of modelling must be overwhelming at times. It must be much easier to go with the flow and blend in with all of the other models. That is why I admire Chrystèle Saint-Louis Augustin, a French model of Caribbean descent (both of her parents are from Martinique according to information I found about her). Why do I admire Ms. Augustin? Well, among other things as the pictures illustrate, she sports a head full of coily hair. In my opinion, she ROCKS HER FRO! It could be said that Ms. Augustin’s mane is remniscent of an earlier super model, Ms. Peggy Dillard. Don’t know who she is? I’ll be sharing more details about her in an upcoming post.

What can Ms. Augustin teach us? Well, I’d argue that if she can make her coily and/or curly hair part of her brand, we can all think about how we can do the same. Granted, we don’t all have model looks, nor do we all work in the entertainment / fashion industries. However, perhaps we each can revisit an unstated (and sometimes stated!) assumption that straightening our tresses is a necessity if we desire to project a professional image.

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Natural Hair Causes Damage? Say WHAT!!!???


Image found at: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_37PkyoJ9DlE/S_69_adx3_I/AAAAAAAAAMI/e2PcOJtGTz0/s1600/african-american-women-suffering-hair-loss.jpg

The following text was copied from a 7/24/11 article by Zuri Brannen of the Observer-Dispatch article entitled, “Hair trends: Women choosing new styles over chemicals” (http://www.uticaod.com/living/x1009570588/Hair-trends-Women-choosing-new-styles-over-chemicals):

All-natural options


Of course, not everyone follows the crowd. Many women still prefer to wear their hair relaxed because they find it easier to manage. Laly Marte, owner of Laly’s Beauty Salon in Utica, said that relaxers are something that some women have grown accustomed to.


“Once you try something new, it’s hard to go back to what you had before,” she said.

Marte encourages women to use relaxers, and does not suggest that they wear their hair natural because it also causes damage.


“If you leave your hair natural, it breaks off,” she said.


Rachel Yangasa, 15, has been getting relaxers since she was eight years old, and said she prefers to keep it that way because it makes her hair straighter and easier to manage. She said that she would never wear her hair natural because of how difficult it would be to maintain it.


“It would be like an afro,” she said.


But her younger sister, 12-year-old Ticia Yangasa, gave up relaxers last year in favor of a chemical-free alternative: wash and sets from hair salons. Stylists wash and straighten her hair using blow dryers and hot irons so that it can still be straight without using chemicals.

Since Ticia switched, she’s noticed that it has helped her hair to grow better, and it is more healthy, she said.


I don’t know if you noticed the comment by Ms. Marte that wearing your hair natural causes it to break off. SAY WHAT!!!! Now, I’m not the natural hair police snatching women up when they get relaxers (wow, is it really necessary, let folks make their own choices!) but I certainly think it’s uncool to say that natural hair causes damage. What do you all think? Have you ever received advice like this?Please share your story and how you responded.

  • topie

    Hi J-Squared! Thanks for your comment. What do you think causes the split ends and knots? Is it being natural or is there something going on with the hair care process? Maybe natural hair needs more trims? Wider tooth combs? Brushing? I don't know your hair type so this might be way off! Just a few thoughts. Thanks for posting! :)

  • J-Squared

    I've heard that natural hair tends to wind up on itself, which causes knots. I trim my hair very often due to the split ends and knots. The front half of my hair is 3b and doesn't knot. The back half of my hair is 3c and it generates alot of tiny knots at the end.I comb with a wide tooth comb and fingers. I've tried deep conditioning more, but that doesnt work either… starting to get a little frustrated :(

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